News Articles on Mercy Springfield

Name of Facility: Mercy Springfield

Location: Springfield, MO, USA



News Articles on Sharpe Hospital

Name of Facility: Sharpe Hospital

Location: Weston, WV, USA


Institute of Living at Hartford Hospital

Name of Facility: Institute of Living at Hartford Hospital

Location of Facility (City, State/Province, Country): Hartford, Connecticut, USA

Number of Stars: 1

Description of Experience: Admitted involuntarily through the emergency room, and against my stated wishes on my advance directive not to be sent to this particular hospital, i was secluded for almost all of the three and a half weeks i was kept there. Although they told ke the room was not “seclusion” only a “quiet room” when i left it and walked down the hallway alone, looked out a window and went back to the room, i was instructed to lie on the bed for restraints, because “you do not follow directions”. Two female nurses restrained me, and injected me in the buttocks with 2 drugs to put me to sleep, and despite my sleeping, they kept me in 4-point restraints for 19 hours. Each time i woke, i asked to be released, but they refused, only injected me again and put me back to sleep. This happened on multiple occasions until my outpatient doctor was so alarmed that i could not meet the criteria for release even from seclusion that she had a consultant meet with me in the absence of my in-patient doctor, and when she simply asked if i wanted to go home, i said, “yes,” and she proceeded to process my discharge. This was only 6 hours after having been released from 4-point restraints and directly from seclusion.

Type of Program (inpatient, outpatient, residential, etc.): Inpatient

Anything that might have impacted your stay? i.e. being LGBTQ+: Schizophrenia diagnosis

Year(s) Your Experience(s) Occurred (i.e. 2015): 2013

Hospital of Central Connecticut

Name of Facility: Hospital of Central Connecticut

Location of Facility (City, State/Province, Country): New Britain, Connecticut, USA

Number of Stars: 1

Description of Experience: I was admitted involuntarily through the Emergency Department and kept in a video monitored room alone the entire four week stay, not permitted utensils to eat food with, bodily escorted to seclusion for “disturbing the milieu” on multiple occasions by guards who were instructed to “inflict pain in order to subdue” me quickly, even though i did not resist. Also on multiple occasions the nurses stripped me naked in seclusion and refused me any covering or blanket for warmth. When i resisted, the male guards 4-point restrained me, in a spread eagle position, to a gurney, still naked, and as was the procedure, injected me with three drugs in the buttocks. Then when i continued to ask to be covered, they put a draw sheet over me, but refused a blanket even though the nurses were shivering with the cold. When i complained about this treatment to the doctor, he said, “You are lying. They would never do that.” But in fact they did these things repeatedly and he was not there to witness it.

Type of Program (inpatient, outpatient, residential, etc.): Inpatient

Anything that might have impacted your stay? i.e. being LGBTQ+: Mutism (chronic but intermittent)

Year(s) Your Experience(s) Occurred (i.e. 2015): 2014

Palmetto Health Baptist Columbia

Name of Facility: Palmetto Health Baptist

Location of Facility (City, State/Province, Country): Columbia, SC

Number of Stars: 1

Description of Experience: I was committed here for my first suicide attempt, and it was my first experience being treated involuntarily for any psych issue. I was admitted to the ward at night and I was anxious, confused, and terrified. A nurse yelled at me and threatened to “send me upstairs where the dangerous ones are.” She held me down, stripped me to take pictures of my self harm scars and cuts, and tranq’d me. I was given my underwear and a hospital gown. The next day, the nurses would not give me my clothes back even though other patients wore street clothes. I was constantly told to stop asking and that I could only have them if I was “good.”

Only one of the nurses was very kind and seemed to care and listen. The psychiatrists, including the one assigned to me, generally seemed to not care much about what the patients were saying and needed.

I was here for about a week, and to this day it’s one of the scariest and most humiliating experiences of my life.

Type of Program (inpatient, outpatient, residential, etc.): Inpatient

Anything that might have impacted your stay? i.e. being LGBTQ+: autism spectrum (undiagnosed at the time)

Year(s) Your Experience(s) Occurred (i.e. 2015): 2011

Holly Hill Hospital

Name of Hospital: Holly Hill Hospital

City, State/Province, Country: Raleigh, NC, USA

Number of Stars: 1.5

Comment: Went there three times in my life.

Nurses would talk down to and insult patients, gossip about them at the front desk. Doctors would use excessive force and discourage peer support. Staff cannot take criticism and it is a major downfall. Was in one unit that had to be put on lockdown at one point because staff couldn’t effectively deal with a fight and patients started getting upset with them, so staff shoved them into walls and sedated them and locked us all in our rooms. Victim blaming is commonplace.

One nurse told me after another patient had vandalized my belongings that some people have worse problems than me. I was neglected in crisis while staff at the front desk watched me and did nothing. Disciplinary action is often given to the victims for being hurt, not to the ones who hurt them. I was once “disciplined” for having a psychotic episode, and also dealt with early stage selective mutism that they couldn’t recognize so instead resorted immediately to “quit lying to us” and were very hostile to me. It seemed like the default opinion was “the patient is being uncooperative on purpose and/or lying” until proven otherwise, and to prove otherwise you had to be in crisis practically 24/7, which presented its own problems.

None of the group therapy sessions were relevant and there wasn’t really any one-on-one therapy. You got put on medication and if it didn’t help they put you on more. No one was allowed to not be on medication. If you weren’t on medication when you came you would be put on something; if you were you’d probably have your prescription upped or altered even if it didn’t make any sense. I was on many meds that I didn’t even need and which made me feel even worse but they wouldn’t let me off of them. Was even refused accommodation when I couldn’t take them due to a swallowing disorder and the med administrator immediately blamed me and withheld them and would not let me try again until I begged.

They had a minimum few days that someone could be there before being released but people were always kept longer. Each time I was there for over a week, sometimes almost two; didn’t matter if you were doing fine. Despite this there seemed to be a pretty high turnover rate. Was once moved units and the room I was put in was excessively hot, had no door on the bathroom, and provided sheeting that could be considered minimal even for most hospitals. Heard reports both while I was there and after I left of sexual assault. Some staff asked me invasive and sexual questions, and during at least one admission strip search I was encouraged to show more than necessary.

I wasn’t informed of any diagnosis I was given throughout the entire stay or even after I left, found out years later that they’d not only completely misdiagnosed me but had included a disorder for me being blunt about the mistreatment (which fueled and validated further abuse as I remained in an out-patient psych system for the next few years). Ward sides with abusive family members over struggling patients anyday.

The few good things I can say are that the food is great, it’s generally pretty clean, and the outdoor areas are roomy, but I don’t remember going outside as much in the second unit I was switched to (from younger adolescent to older teen unit). There’s also a lot of opportunity for peer support since you have a bunch of people in one unit and lots of free time, but obviously whoever your co-patients are is a gamble.

I wouldn’t ever recommend voluntarily admitting yourself here unless you don’t mind being forced on medication and having little to do, but if you have to go I’d say try your luck with the others before you fully confide in any of the staff. It’s been maybe two or three years since I went but from what I know a lot of the same people still work there, and the negative attitudes that reign don’t seem to be going away anytime soon.

Type of program (i.e. day program, inpatient): Inpatient

Any other identities/marginalizations (i.e. race/gender/sexuality) that could have influenced your stay?: Staff assumed cis girl, Not openly LGBTQ+ when I went

Year(s) : 2013/2014

News Articles on Park Royal Hospital

Name of Hospital: Park Royal Hospital

Location: Fort Myers, FL, USA


NBC2, “Park Royal employee accused of sexual assault against patients,” September 2013: “A healthcare worker tasked with taking care of the mentally ill is now accused of inappropriate acts with his patients. Deputies say Benjamin Bland sexually assaulted five people at Park Royal Hospital.”

Press News, “Park Royal Hospital sexual abuse lawsuit settled,” June 2016: The former patients sexually abused in the 2013 case above settled a lawsuit against the facility.

Press News, Park Royal Hospital patient care deficiencies highlighted in federal inspection report,” November 2017: “Park Royal Hospital, the region’s only inpatient psychiatric health center, was too short-staffed to properly supervise patients, ignored their complaints, and had poor quality control procedures in place, federal inspectors concluded in a recently published report,” including not following up on patient complaints and physical restraint issues.

Press News, “Park Royal Hospital, Fort Myers’ only psychiatric hospital, gets a new leader,” February 2018: “Last month, the Lee County Sheriff’s Office investigated an alleged sexual assault on a patient. It is also looking into the deaths of two patients who had recently been brought in for involuntary mental health evaluations under the state’s Baker Act.”