News Articles on Unity Center for Behavioral Health

Name of Facility: Unity Center for Behavioral Health

Location: Portland, OR, USA

News articles:

OrgeonLive/The Oregonian, “Serious safety problems plague Portland’s premier mental health center, state investigation shows,” August 2018: “State investigators have placed Portland’s premier psychiatric crisis center on notice that it could lose its federal certification as early as next month unless it fixes widespread safety problems that allowed patient harm in repeated cases, including attempted suicide and at least one death from alleged medical neglect. The Oregon Health Authority released a 105-page list of issues at Unity after The Oregonian/OregonLive filed a public records request.”

Sinai Hospital

Name of Facility: Sinai Hospital

Location of Facility (City, State/Province, Country): Baltimore, MD, USA

Number of Stars: 2.5

Description of Experience: It was a pretty run of the mill ward. I was in for severe anxiety leading to suicidal distress and a voluntary admit. The emergency department was not very great; they forgot to get my insurance information and when they moved me to the transitional unit they took all my possessions until I was on the ward. Fortunately, I was more prepared than the other time I’d been in an ED and the removal of all possessions happened, but it still sucked.

They let you wear your own clothes on the ward (except I’m assuming stuff like bras with wires). They noticed and did something about my anxiety, which was good, it was a medication I could take as needed (they wouldn’t give me the stuff like Ativan, but something called Vistaril). They didn’t count not going to the groups because I was down and out with bronchitis against me.

After three days with no caffeine I was a bit grumpy with the nurse assigned to me and got a lecture on how if I didn’t control my behavior I’d have to stay longer. I perceived this as coercion and pushed back to ask her “Are you coercing me?” which she seemed offended by. (It was coercion and an exercise of control).

Another time (my second night) I was told you could only make one long-distance call per visit, which I had already made one and was told I could not by a psych specialist or admin assistant. I went back and began sobbing hysterically in my room because my friends are my safety net. It took them at least 10 minutes to bother to go see if I was okay and offer me anything for my anxiety. Most of the nurses/psych specialists besides that one would still let you make as many long distance calls as you wanted. It was just that one who was a stickler to the rule.

They made use of the seclusion rooms a couple of times while I was there. One was an elderly woman and I overheard the nurse telling the security guards the reason she was in there was “because she attacked me, the dumb bitch.” I told another nurse about that statement because it made me really uncomfortable and worried about the woman in the room. Another was a younger woman who apparently broke the door of her room.

They didn’t bother to do anything about the older man who asked me to be his girlfriend and laughed it off because he did it to everyone. I finally had to tell him off myself and he didn’t speak to me again, which was a relief.

There were security cameras everywhere, including in your room. There was basically no privacy – I resorted to changing in the bathroom, which sometimes the toilet was clogged because for some reason the ward always seemed out of toilet paper. The food was chronically late. One time it was almost 2 hours late for breakfast. It wasn’t that great but vaguely edible, and I saw at least one other patient receiving kosher meals – Sinai is a Jewish-affiliated hospital. So I would extrapolate that they at least respect dietary preferences and restrictions.

I didn’t see any preferential treatment based on race, but I could have missed it – I’m white, and a lot of the patients were Black. It definitely seemed at least preferential toward the less “complex” and the “easier” patients like me.

They had a hard time getting my meds sorted out at first, almost until I was about ready to leave, which was a bit ridiculous. Once I was stabilized (and done sleeping off my bronchitis), I was ridiculously bored and finished most of my books I was reading. There were basically a few board games and puzzles, magazines, a TV, and groups, though I can’t speak to the therapy groups as a way to pass time or their therapeutic value.

I didn’t get a whole lot of a discharge planning, either. I wasn’t helped to connect with resources in my area at all except for a print-out of some Jewish social service agencies.

Type of Program (inpatient, outpatient, residential, etc.): Inpatient

Anything that might have impacted your stay? i.e. being LGBTQ+: Nonbinary (did not disclose), queer, Autistic, Jewish conversion student

Year(s) Your Experience(s) Occurred (i.e. 2015): 2018

News Articles on Anderson Health Services

Name of Facility: Anderson Health Services

Location: Marshville, NC, USA

Articles:

Charlotte Observer, Teens in NC psych center were choked, zip tied, faced ‘imminent danger,’ state says,” June 2018: “Newly released state records and investigative reports obtained by the Observer detail allegations of physical abuse, faulty treatment and failures by Anderson Health Services since it opened in Marshville in September.”

 

News Articles on Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry

Name of Facility: Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry

Location: Columbus, OH, USA

News Articles:

WOSU Public Media (WOSU Radio), “Disability Group Asks Ohio To Protect Patients At Columbus Psychiatric Hospital,” May 2018: “Disability Rights Ohio released a report this week calling attention to Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry’s violations of treatment standards and patient safety – including allegations of physical and sexual abuse.”

News Articles on Mercy Springfield

Name of Facility: Mercy Springfield

Location: Springfield, MO, USA

Articles

 

News Articles on Sharpe Hospital

Name of Facility: Sharpe Hospital

Location: Weston, WV, USA

Articles

Institute of Living at Hartford Hospital

Name of Facility: Institute of Living at Hartford Hospital

Location of Facility (City, State/Province, Country): Hartford, Connecticut, USA

Number of Stars: 1

Description of Experience: Admitted involuntarily through the emergency room, and against my stated wishes on my advance directive not to be sent to this particular hospital, i was secluded for almost all of the three and a half weeks i was kept there. Although they told ke the room was not “seclusion” only a “quiet room” when i left it and walked down the hallway alone, looked out a window and went back to the room, i was instructed to lie on the bed for restraints, because “you do not follow directions”. Two female nurses restrained me, and injected me in the buttocks with 2 drugs to put me to sleep, and despite my sleeping, they kept me in 4-point restraints for 19 hours. Each time i woke, i asked to be released, but they refused, only injected me again and put me back to sleep. This happened on multiple occasions until my outpatient doctor was so alarmed that i could not meet the criteria for release even from seclusion that she had a consultant meet with me in the absence of my in-patient doctor, and when she simply asked if i wanted to go home, i said, “yes,” and she proceeded to process my discharge. This was only 6 hours after having been released from 4-point restraints and directly from seclusion.

Type of Program (inpatient, outpatient, residential, etc.): Inpatient

Anything that might have impacted your stay? i.e. being LGBTQ+: Schizophrenia diagnosis

Year(s) Your Experience(s) Occurred (i.e. 2015): 2013