Haven Psychiatric Hospital

Name of Facility: Haven Psychiatric Hospital

Location of Facility (City, State/Province, Country): Dayton, Ohio, USA

Number of Stars: 1

Description of Experience: I submitted myself for a voluntary hold because I was having problems with my medications. Having only one previous hospitalization, which I consider the best decision of my life, I came here with high hopes for making a plan to get me back on track. Within a couple hours I realized what a horrible mistake I’d made.

This was not only my perception—every person there who had been previously hospitalized agreed that this was by far the worst place they’d ever been to.

The staff was awful. Some days it was 15 patients to a nurse, making it impossible for them to do their job effectively or even give us meds as needed since they were so busy. Apparently there is a real doctor on staff but my only interaction with her was one day she passed me in the hall and asked if I was feeling ok. Since she didn’t introduce herself and I’d never seen her before I assumed she was just being polite, not realizing that that was apparently my doctor visit for the day! On the other days I saw a “doctor” who turned out to be a nurse practitioner, which is fine but I don’t think it’s ok for an NP to present themselves as an MD in a hospital!

The nurse practitioner decided to put me on an antipsychotic at three times the typical dose for schizophrenia with no titration the first day I was there, despite having no history of psychosis or violence ( he himself diagnosed me with depression WITHOUT psychotic features). The dose was so high I had distorted vision and was seeing colors that weren’t there! However I also quickly saw that anyone who complained about it (EVERYONE regardless of diagnoses was on antipsychotics) was told they wouldn’t be released until they agreed to take it for three days, which left me in a position where I felt like I was being medicated against my will, with a medication that harmed me, due to the threats for not taking it.

The hospital serves three populations: adult psych patients, (non-medicated) drug detoxing, and geriatric psych. There was no division of violent and nonviolent patients, meaning that some of the people going through withdrawal and/or psychosis were literally assaulting the other patients while staff looked on. One man urinated and defecated in the halls, with the staff maybe picking it up after a few hours but never sanitizing the area. The same man crawled into several women’s beds while they were sleeping, which the staff brushed off as ‘oh he doesn’t know what he’s doing ‘.

My roommate was 102 years old and I was essentially her aide. She had severe dementia and thought I worked for her, which the staff encouraged, often bringing her to me to watch when they didn’t want to be bothers. The aides at this place seemed either irritated or disgusted with us, and would stop to chat with each other for 20+ minutes at a time after you asked for help. In the five days I was there my roommate did not have her dirty sheets changed on a single occasion that I didn’t do it. All of the elderly patients were treated similarly. Left for hours in their excrement and page buttons ignored. Apparently helping someone get out of bed and into a wheelchair is too much to ask, so elderly patients would spend most of the day staring at the walls crying. There were numerous cases of elder abuse/neglect seen every day.

There was very little to do. Exercise was usually 20 minutes of chair stretches. Art/music therapy was very good and ran by a part-time activities person who was one of the few staff who seemed to genuinely care. There were two large televisions but nurses kept the remote. The food wasn’t very good and there were very few options. Portions were small and you could not order extra food without approval (I was denied the soup I ordered because that was too much food with a turkey sandwich).

While the aides resented and ignored us, and the nurses were too overworked to help us, the social workers and doctors were practically nonexistent. My one other hospitalization involved two group therapy sessions a day, seeing the doctor every day, and making an individualized plan with my assigned social worker, this place did none of those things. We were supposed to have two groups a day led my the social workers, but in the five days I was there not a single one was held. My intake assessment with the doctor took about three minutes. I saw him come in each morning but he never spoke to me again until I was discharged. This was also the only time I spoke with the social worker. Instead of making a plan with me she just talked at me for a couple minutes then checked off boxes which said things like I have a safe home (I didn’t) or that I refused counseling (I wasn’t offered).

They were pro LGBT in the sense that they didn’t seem to think it existed, so therefor ignored it. This was certainly better than their obsession with straight sex. I got warnings for walking down the hall with a man, no touching, in plain sight. I understand this is an inappropriate place for sexual conduct, but surely that would be better addressed one-on-one as it arises, rather than the weird paternalism which was suspicious of people talking but fine when someone was actually being sexually harassed/assaulted. Most of us women were groped or grabbed and the woman next room over found a guy masturbating all over her bed, but this was ignored.

Quite frankly, this place was so traumatic that it’s come up in my therapy sessions as we work through my PTSD. I left far worse off than when I arrived.

Type of Program (inpatient, outpatient, residential, etc.): Inpatient

Anything that might have impacted your stay? i.e. being LGBTQ+: Bi

Year(s) Your Experience(s) Occurred (i.e. 2015): 2018

News Articles on Unity Center for Behavioral Health

Name of Facility: Unity Center for Behavioral Health

Location: Portland, OR, USA

News articles:

OrgeonLive/The Oregonian, “Serious safety problems plague Portland’s premier mental health center, state investigation shows,” August 2018: “State investigators have placed Portland’s premier psychiatric crisis center on notice that it could lose its federal certification as early as next month unless it fixes widespread safety problems that allowed patient harm in repeated cases, including attempted suicide and at least one death from alleged medical neglect. The Oregon Health Authority released a 105-page list of issues at Unity after The Oregonian/OregonLive filed a public records request.”

Sagamore Children’s Psychiatric Center

Name of Facility: Sagamore Children’s Psychiatric Center

Location: Dix Hills, New York, United States

Number of Stars: 1

Description of Experience: I was here for 4 months, I think it was 2015. I was transferred here from another hospital (Mather), so so so excited it would be beneficial to my treatment. Once I got there, I noticed things were off.

I had to be cleared to go to school like with every hospital, so I sat down on the couch in the mini rec area of the unit and turned on the TV. Soon, a nurse came storming through flipping shit “where the FUCK do you think you are? This is NOT Mather!! You CAN NOT do whatever the fuck you want!!” And grabbed the remote, turned it off, and demanded I asked for it to be turned on again. At that point they moved me to wait in another unit, so for 7 hours everyday I sat staring at the wall in the eating area since I wasn’t allowed to watch TV or even sit where all the books were in this unit.

Also, there was no choices for food. Choice of food sounds like a lot to ask for, but the slop they served us definitely was not above jail food quality. The smell of it would make anyone gag. If someone wasn’t able to manage to swallow this filth, the staff saw it as refusal to eat and sent them to their room where they weren’t allowed to come out for the rest of the day. We quickly learned how to hide inedible food under salad and in milk containers to make it look like we’ve eaten. Every single patient on the unit has done this.

Phone calls. Phone calls to family was a lucky thing. Only one phone call a day, and if that’s a time where family members aren’t available or at work well not their problem. There was a lot of times where the phone didn’t work at all.

ITP. Intensive Treatment Plan (I think it was called). This is where you could’ve done the smallest mundane thing and had all your “privileges” taken away. “Privileges” as in ability to leave your room or even make phone calls over 3 minutes. Pretty much everything was taken away. I had to plead to not get on this “plan” just because I had drawn an ‘anarchy’ symbol on my shoe.

The showers. We had to shower twice a day, even though we went nowhere and pretty much just sat in a room all day. And that wouldn’t be a problem, but the showers and sinks sometimes had maggots crawling out of them.

No therapy what-so-ever. I don’t even remember seeing a therapist weekly, maybe some sort of social worker for 10 or so minutes a week. I remember there only being one therapeutic group my whole time there. The whole time was like some sort of abusive babysitting facility.

This is how mental healthcare is all over this island. It’s all based on “behavior”. As in, you behave good you’re getting better. You behave good, you get more “privileges”. A lot of times they don’t notice mental illness is more than behavior (I was always an obedient child, never even gotten detention in my life). And yet, they treat every child as a disobedient juvenile who has to be taught to “behave”. So many places would have “levels”. You behave, you get up a level. But as I must reiterate, working on mental health is a lot more than just “learning how to be well behaved”

Type of Program (inpatient, outpatient, residential, etc.): Inpatient

News Articles on Anderson Health Services

Name of Facility: Anderson Health Services

Location: Marshville, NC, USA

Articles:

Charlotte Observer, Teens in NC psych center were choked, zip tied, faced ‘imminent danger,’ state says,” June 2018: “Newly released state records and investigative reports obtained by the Observer detail allegations of physical abuse, faulty treatment and failures by Anderson Health Services since it opened in Marshville in September.”

 

News Articles on Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry

Name of Facility: Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry

Location: Columbus, OH, USA

News Articles:

WOSU Public Media (WOSU Radio), “Disability Group Asks Ohio To Protect Patients At Columbus Psychiatric Hospital,” May 2018: “Disability Rights Ohio released a report this week calling attention to Ohio Hospital for Psychiatry’s violations of treatment standards and patient safety – including allegations of physical and sexual abuse.”

News Articles on Delaware Psychiatric Center

Name of Facility: Delaware Psychiatric Center

Location: New Castle, DE, USA

Articles

  • Washington Post, “Ex-psychiatric hospital workers plead to criminal charges,” February 2018:  “Prosecutors said the three did not check on a 38-year-old male patient as required in December 2016, but signed logs indicating they had done so. The man died. Another former DPC worker… who worked as a security guard pleaded no contest to patient abuse for having an inappropriate sexual relationship with a DPC patient last summer.”

Bodmin Community Hospital – Fletcher Ward

Name of Facility: Bodmin Community Hospital – Fletcher Ward

Location of Facility (City, State/Province, Country): Bodmin Cornwall UK

Number of Stars: 1.5

Description of Experience: On arrival I saw that both staff and patients looked terrified but patients more so. One patient I knew from the town where I lived. Other patients I recognised from my stay 3 months earlier. One patient from my first stay was still ill like the last time. They don’t treat any physical health problems here, they don’t even investigate.

The only outside space was the smoking courtyard, a glass box in middle of ward, floor covered with cigarette ends and vomit from the poor lady whose physical condition had worsened. I phoned the police reporting the abuse on the ward. Another patient also phoned, this patient said he was threatened with being killed by staff if he phoned the police again. I was forced to drink a cup of water with medication I wasn’t prescribed in it. I reckon I’m lucky to survive those side effects which they say I didn’t have.

There had been a large outside space but it was closed for landscaping. The courtyard was approximately 3 meters square. The staff liked to be vindictive and ignored patients. Hot drinks were only allowed at set times and provided in large jugs, one of tea and one of hot water.

The only saving grace for this ward was a occupational therapist who tried her best but the culture was bad. All patients were treated with fear and distrust.

I’ve since obtained my medical records relating to this stay I was bowled over by the factually incorrect information. (Me and another patient being over the top polite asking for the courtyard to be opened 10 minutes before 6am were classed as offensive – saying please is offensive?!)

Risk management was centred around aggression not self harm. Chairs which could be thrown removed at night but Christmas Tree had glass bubbles and a long string of electric fairy lights. The Christmas Tree was never removed at night.

The other ward in Cornwall is actually quite good.

Type of Program (inpatient, outpatient, residential, etc.): Inpatient admission ward

Anything that might have impacted your stay? i.e. being LGBTQ+: I’d complained and have long history of contact with MH services

Year(s) Your Experience(s) Occurred (i.e. 2015): Dec 2016