Chicago Lakeshore Hospital

Name of Facility: Chicago Lakeshore Hospital

Location of Facility (City, State/Province, Country): Chicago, IL, USA

Number of Stars: 1

Description of Experience: I was admitted to Chicago Lakeshore Hospital in 2017 based on an unfounded belief by a family member that I might be suicidal (which I in no way was). I have a 30-year history of chronic, treatment-resistant depression (without a single suicidal incident). The episode that resulted in my hospitalization, however, was an isolated occurrence of distress based on a situation with my wife earlier that week, which turned out to be groundless and was completely resolved earlier, after which time I was, if anything, feeling better.

Nevertheless, the family member I mentioned above felt it necessary call the police (who approached me as I was calmly enjoying a donut and coffee in front of a local donut shop), resulting in my being hauled off to Northwest Community Hospital for evaluation, and based solely on a phone call between the Psychiatric Liaison and the psychiatrist on call. I was sent to Chicago Lakeshore early the next morning and placed under the “care” of another psychiatrist. I was never suicidal nor was I having any suicidal thoughts.

In spite of my insistence that the whole affair originated from a short-lasting episode in which my depression played no part, throughout my week-long stay at Chicago Lakeshore, the psychiatrist remained doggedly fixated on it, raising the subject at every one of our daily meetings, fiddling with my antidepressant medication dosage, which was already being well-managed my regular psychiatrist, who had been treating me for some 14 years and who has my complete trust. Yet the psychiatrist persisted in treating the actual precipitating incident as irrelevant. After 30 years of coping with depression, I could very well discern the difference between it and a very short-lived situation, which, unlike depression, does not abruptly evaporate the moment the underlying cause is resolved.

The hospital offered daily group therapy sessions, which I declined, since, again, the precipitating incident had been completely resolved. Virtually all of my other time at the hospital was spent lying in bed in a state of growing rage over my situation and the doctor’s incompetent and negligent handling of it. My hospitalization was the result of a total disregard or misinterpretation of the facts of the incident and caused me significant emotional distress and difficulty interacting with my family.

If the various hospital personnel involved had taken care to perform a competent evaluation of the situation and take subsequent action based on the facts rather than supposition and unfounded assumptions, it would have dispelled their notion that I was a suicide risk and avoided a completely unnecessary, traumatic and ultimately harmful week of involuntary hospitalization. The overall effect of my hospitalization, far from being therapeutic, was to leave me far more distressed, enraged and agitated – resulted in a deepening of my depression – which continues to the present day along with a deep sense of rage at the harm it has caused.

Considering the facts, how any competent mental health professional could find a rationale for requiring hospitalization of someone who has neither displayed any behavior nor expressed any thoughts indicating an intention to attempt suicide totally escapes me. But hospitalized I was – either because the Psychiatric Liaison took poor notes, was not paying attention to my comments when she interviewed me, did a poor job of communicating her information to the psychiatrist on call or because he misinterpreted the information provided by the Psychiatric Liaison, I have no way of knowing.

I only know the result: that he ordered me hospitalized based on a serious or at least superficial understanding of the facts of the situation or based on a lack of a complete understanding of those facts. The end result was an utterly unwarranted order for my involuntary hospitalization in a psychiatric facility, a hospitalization that would prove to provide no benefit, protect me from a nonexistent risk, and ultimately cause me considerable distress.

The doctor at Lakeshore visited me daily throughout the week, again fixated on my depression as my core issue. On Wednesday (I believe) we had a discussion of the dosage of the antidepressant I have been taking for many years. I told him that until sometime the previous November I had been taking 40 mg. per day, but around that time I began to experience something like panic attacks, and my regular psychiatrist reduced the dose to 10 mg., after which the problem ceased.

He expressed the opinion that a 10 mg. dose was too low and told me he would me increasing my dose to 20 mg. The following day, however, he informed me that the admissions people had (incorrectly, obviously) recorded my current dose as 40 mg., but despite my insistence that this was clearly an error during the admissions process, he then told me that he was now going to increase my dose to 60 mg. He had clearly not referred back to his notes from the previous day before making this decision.

Friday of that week arrived, and I spoke briefly with the social worker assigned to me , who indicated that there was no reason I could not be discharged as soon as the doctor signed the discharge order. Late in the day, I encountered the social worker  as he was about to leave work and asked him about the status of my discharge. He informed me that the psychiatrist had simply failed to sign the order before leaving, with the result that I would remain confined to the hospital until Monday.

On either Saturday or Sunday (I do not now recall which), the psychiatrist on call for the weekend visited me, and I explained the psychiatrist’s confusion about my antidepressant dose, resulting in it’s being reduced again to 20mg.

The time I had to dwell on my incompetent treatment and separation from my family, far from being therapeutic, left me in a far worse mental state after leaving the hospital than prior to my admission. My rage, for all the reasons I mention above, continues to fester within me to a degree where I frequently become too agitated to do anything productive or interact with others.

If you should ever have to deal with either of these psychiatric “professionals”, do yourself a favor and insist that they not be involved in your “care” so they will not have an opportunity to inflict the same damage on you that they did on me.

Type of Program (inpatient, outpatient, residential, etc.): Inpatient

Anything that might have impacted your stay? i.e. being LGBTQ+: Gross disregard of the facts related to my situation

Year(s) Your Experience(s) Occurred (i.e. 2015): 2017

Chicago Lakeshore Hospital

Name of Hospital: Chicago Lakeshore Hospital

City, State/Province, Country: Chicago, IL, USA

Number of Stars: 1

Comment: I was admitted during a psychotic mixed episode and was totally unimpressed by this hospital. I spent over 7 hours in intake doing nothing, and the staff refused to let me use the restroom. They are severely understaffed and the staff that they do have is horribly unprofessional. The orderlies continuously mocked the patients, and minimized their illnesses. I had multiple staff members tell me i was “too pretty to be depressed”. Other staff members would jokingly talk about very triggering subject matter such as sexual assault and pedophilia, and intentionally challenged certain patient’s delusions, causing the patients to have violent outbursts or breakdowns. The psychiatrist would only see me for a maximum of 5 minutes every day and put me on medications for depression which wasn’t my issue at all.

They have what they call a “5 day” inpatient program, and i was repeatedly told that i could leave on Friday (i was admitted on a Monday), but i was held through the weekend involuntarily due to my social worker not doing her job. This social worker released false information to my school saying that i had a suicide attempt on campus, thus leaving me barred from going back to my dorm until i was cleared by an outpatient psychiatrist.

Type of program (i.e. day program, inpatient): “5” day inpatient program that actually amounts to at least 7 days because “weekends don’t count”

Any other identities/marginalizations i.e. race/gender/sexuality that could have influenced your stay?: I am bisexual